The new, legal magic brownie controversy - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

The new, legal magic brownie controversy

CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) - You may have heard of pot brownies. They're supposed to mellow you out; illegally. But there is a new magic brownie on the market that is very legal, and does not contain marijuana.

They're called Lazy Cakes. The company replaced the marijuana with melatonin. For the most part, melatonin is safe, unless it gets into the wrong hands; like the hands of a 2-year-old boy. "He was in his toy room playing and then he came down here and lay down," said Kameron Cummings, the toddler's uncle. "He was just acting all funny he wouldn't play or nothing."

"Only thing I can do is hope and pray that he was okay," said the mother, Kizwanna Cummings.

Kameron is considering himself very lucky, after the mistake he made while taking care of his 2-year-old nephew. "I just gave him a little piece cause he wanted some so I just cut him off a little piece," said Kameron. "I didn't really know what it was I just thought it was going to be a regular type of brownie just had a name to it."

The name is Lazy Cakes, touted as the world's first relaxation brownie. The secret ingredient is melatonin, and a host of other calming herbs. The company claims to put a smile on your face, and helps your problems melt away, but there are some dangers. This is for adults only.

"A lot of adults will take it to help go to sleep and get a good night sleep. The problem is the actual brownie has four times the amount that you would get in a normal capsule," said Dr. Ann Payne-Johnson, Baptist Memorial Health Care.

"We didn't think anything of it until my mom looked on the back of it and it said recommended for adults only," said Kizwanna.

By then, it was too late. Little Michael was passed out.  "He just kind of laid down and went to sleep," said Kameron. "He would sleep and he wouldn't wake up and when he was waking up he was crying a lot."

"What we've seen with the kids is that they go to sleep and adults sometime have a hard time waking them up," said Dr. Payne-Johnson. "Sometimes the kids have been taken to the emergency room and even in the emergency room there is no way to wake them up."

The makers of Lazy Cakes say "the product is clearly marked as being intended for adults only."

Which is true, the package and the website have a warning. The makers go on to say "we trust they will make educated decisions about what they choose to consume."

Kameron Cummings says he bought the brownie, and he is only 15. "I should have never gave it to him really...but the main thing is that the store shouldn't have sold it to me without asking for my ID," said Kameron.

A lazy store clerk? You decide, but this doctor says don't let these brownies, or any melatonin supplement, get into the wrong hands. "It will kill you if you get the wrong dose, yes," said Dr. Payne-Johnson. "It's a drug. Those brownies are definitely a drug."

Lazy Cakes are made by a company in Memphis, but anyone can buy them online. The company cites a 2002 report in pediatrics that says 15 percent of pediatricians recommend melatonin to help kids with insomnia. A lot of other experts would disagree.

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