Overload On Electric Grid In 1998 Prompted Warnings - Cincinnati News, Weather, Sports from FOX19 NOW-WXIX

Overload On Electric Grid In 1998 Prompted Warnings

Overload on electric grid in 1998 prompted warnings

Five years ago, Ohio regulators and others warned that the nation's power systems might not be able to handle growing consumer demand. The warning came after there was an overload on the Midwest's electric grids in 1998. The problems five years ago are seen by some as foreshadowing to last week's massive blackout. In 1998, temperatures consistently in the 90s led to an increased demand for power in Ohio. The grid was nearing its capacity when a tornado wrecked transmission lines at the Davis-Besse nuclear plant near Toledo, further straining the system. That caused the cost of electricity to skyrocket from 40 dollars per megawatt hour to more than 75-hundred. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the Public Utilities Commission of Ohio then issued their warnings with PU-CO warning that it could happen again.

  • FOX19 HeadlinesMore>>

  • Trump says he'll sign order ending child-parent separation

    Trump says he'll sign order ending child-parent separation

    Wednesday, June 20 2018 11:21 AM EDT2018-06-20 15:21:21 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 3:25 PM EDT2018-06-20 19:25:21 GMT
    A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility Tuesday in McAllen, TX. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

    Full Story >

    Trump signs executive order to keep families together at border, says 'zero-tolerance' prosecution policy will continue.

    Full Story >
  • APNewsBreak: At least 3 shelters set up for child migrants

    APNewsBreak: At least 3 shelters set up for child migrants

    Tuesday, June 19 2018 9:12 PM EDT2018-06-20 01:12:25 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 3:25 PM EDT2018-06-20 19:25:10 GMT
    Nicole Hernandez, of the Mexican state of Guerrero, holds on to her mother as they wait with other families to request political asylum in the United States, across the border in Tijuana, Mexico, on Wednesday, June 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)Nicole Hernandez, of the Mexican state of Guerrero, holds on to her mother as they wait with other families to request political asylum in the United States, across the border in Tijuana, Mexico, on Wednesday, June 13, 2018. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

    Migrant babies and young children are being held in special "tender age" shelters after being taken from their parents at the US-Mexico border.

    Full Story >

    Migrant babies and young children are being held in special "tender age" shelters after being taken from their parents at the US-Mexico border.

    Full Story >
  • No clear plan yet on how to reunite parents with children

    No clear plan yet on how to reunite parents with children

    Wednesday, June 20 2018 2:31 AM EDT2018-06-20 06:31:19 GMT
    Wednesday, June 20 2018 3:18 PM EDT2018-06-20 19:18:03 GMT
    (AP Photo/Eric Gay). A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. More than 2,300 minors have been separated from their families crossing the border to...(AP Photo/Eric Gay). A boy stares out of a heavily tinted bus window leaving a U.S. Customs and Border Protection facility, Tuesday, June 19, 2018, in McAllen, Texas. More than 2,300 minors have been separated from their families crossing the border to...
    Trump administration officials have no clear plan on how to reunite some of the 2,300 minors separated from their families at the border as a result of a zero-tolerance policy of criminally prosecuting anyone...Full Story >
    Trump administration officials have no clear plan on how to reunite some of the 2,300 minors separated from their families at the border as a result of a zero-tolerance policy of criminally prosecuting anyone caught entering the U.S. illegally.Full Story >
Powered by Frankly