FUNERAL HOME PUTS GRIEF TO REST - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

FUNERAL HOME PUTS GRIEF TO REST

Georgia Hatter - for the second time - is mourning the death of her father.  "I don't know how many of the ashes of my father are out there," she says.

When Robert Ranshaw died five years ago - the 59-year-old sign painter had two wishes. That his body be cremated. And donated to science.

"That was my dad. He wanted to help other people," says his daughter.

Ranshaw's body was given to the University of Kentucky - where he was treated for a fatal lung disease. Last week - five years after UK got his body - Robert's remains were mailed to his daughter.

"As soon as we opened the box - ashes were just everywhere."

Somehow the box was damaged - and the plastic bag containing Robert's ashes sprung holes. "That's my father," says Georgia pointing to the ashes.

Georgia is troubled over the way UK handled her father's remains. She says it was totally insensitive.

A plastic bag. Stuffed in a black plastic box. With her father's name and numer scribbled on a piece of masking tape. "A number. He deserved better than this.">

Georgia says the college blames the post office and the post office blames the college. Upset - she called FOX 19.

"I don't want anybody to go through what I went through.">

Living paycheck to paycheck and unable to buy an urn - we found Georgia some help.

Paul Young of Young Funeral Homes donated this urn. Georgia's pastor brought support and prayer. And robert ranshaw's remains were properly put to rest.

"And here we commit the remains to your care. In name of Father, Son and Holy Spirit we pray. Amen.">

"You always want to give back to the community to people who need things," says Paul Young.

"I want to thank them for what they done. Donating the urn. Their service and time," says Georgia.

What happened here was truly unfortunate," says FOX 19 Consumer Reporter Tom Sussi.  But the University of Kentucky didn't deliver anything more or anything less than spelled out in this contract provided to people who donate their bodies to science.  This contract does call for an urn or compassion.

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