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Best college degrees

RICHMOND, VA (WWBT) - How would you like to graduate, or have your kids graduate, with a degree that guarantees a job right out of college?

What are the types of college degrees that will likely get your foot in the door in the next decade? Business, education, technology, and health care.

"There's just so many job opportunities in nursing," said nursing student Aleshia Bokeno.

You don't have to tell these nursing students twice — they're studying in a 10-month practical nursing program, training they know will get them an extra jump in the job market.

"I don't know any other program that an individual could go through and come out and have the job stability and the security as far as the money that they can make," said nursing instructor Judy Bartles.

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, health care jobs will grow faster than any other industry.

"That had a lot to do with me coming to school, so that I could better support my daughter, and I feel that as an LPN I can do that," said student Ashley Carpenter.

The average salary for a registered nurse is $62,000 a year, and Bartels says the LPN's in her program can come out making a decent salary as well.

"When they get out of school, some of them work evening and night shifts, and they might be making as much as $18 to $20 an hour, so it's a pretty good salary," said Bartels.

But it's not just about the kind of degree and training you have but also where you get it from.

"An alum of Harvard, people will assume that, that person, number one, is a leader," said Harvard graduate Tracy Moore. "Because of the brand of Harvard, companies are willing to pay a premium for students who have graduated from there."

Harvard grads can make a median salary of nearly $57,000 out of college. Mid-career, the median salary jumps to $121,000 a year.

According to payscale.com, in addition to Harvard, graduates from Dartmouth, Princeton University, Stanford University, Harvey Mudd college, MIT, Colgate and Cal-Tech all report making at least $119,000 a year, and the dollars can double even after you get your diploma.

"Having a Masters in Business, hopefully will put me a step ahead," said student Torre Stark.

The MBA is arguably the go-to-degree to supplement a bachelor's while solidifying success in the job market and a decent salary.

According to the U.S. Dept. of Labor, job opportunities for MBA grads will rise 83 percent.

"It really gives students a first advantage in terms of finding a job in the real world," said Stark

Experts agree, the kind of degree you get and where you get that degree from could have a major impact on your future.

Http://www.payscale.com/best-colleges/degrees.asp

http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges

http://www.princetonreview.com/college/top-ten-majors.aspx

Copyright 2011 WWBT NBC12. All rights reserved.

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