Fort Thomas officer takes heroin message directly to students - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Fort Thomas officer takes heroin message directly to youth

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Fort Thomas Police Officer Chris Goshorn Fort Thomas Police Officer Chris Goshorn
FORT THOMAS, KY (FOX19) -

As the heroin epidemic continues to wreck havoc on lives across the Tri-State, a number of groups are working to combat the problem.

A recently formed group teamed up with a Fort Thomas Police officer to take its message to the classroom.

Like most kids, the students here at Highlands Middle School are faced with all kinds of temptation and Friday they learned that giving into the temptation of heroin can have fatal consequences. 

Like a man shown in a recent police dash cam video who nearly dies from a heroin overdose shortly after being stopped by Fort Thomas Police.

It's a dose of heroin's reality presented by Officer Chris Goshorn.

"I was trying to think of what I could do to show at an eighth grade level how serious the problem is and how (heroin does) affect your life," Goshorn said.

Goshorn also used bubble gum to demonstrate how heroin can take over and eventually ruin your life.

"How's that gum it's pretty flavorful right? (It's) pretty enjoyable. It simulates the euphoria they say you get from that first dose," Goshorn said. "She's got lots of flavor. She's really enjoying it, it's intense. You probably want more don't you sure you want more." 

Mary Claire Redden, a Highlands Middle School eighth grade student, said "it's so easily accessible to our age group. (It's) like we can go and get it if we really want it. (It's) like no one is stopping us."

Nick Gish, a Highlands Middle School eighth grade student, noticed "the devastation of people's lives being lost from the heroin overdoses." 

Highlands Middle School eighth grade student Josie Daley said she doesn't "like how the people addicted to heroin couldn't get help. ... People refused helping them. That bothered me." 

Holly Specht co-founded NKY Hates Heroin after her son Nick died from an overdose six months ago.

"When I get a phone call from a mom who said 'when we visited your website we found all the answers that we needed to help get our daughter into a rehab center.' That phone call made everything worth it. It makes it all worth it when someone, possibly a life, (can) be saved."

The anti-heroin message will be reinforced with follow up lessons throughout the year because frequent reminders may save someone's life.

You can learn more about NKY Hates Heroin by logging onto nkyhatesheroin.com.

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