Condor comeback: First eggs spotted in breeding season - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Condor comeback: First eggs spotted in breeding season for endangered bird

Posted: Updated:
(Source: Arizona Game and Fish Department) (Source: Arizona Game and Fish Department)
  • Most ReadMost ReadMore>>

  • Debunking the Tire Myth

    Debunking the Tire Myth

    Thursday, July 31 2014 11:23 PM EDT2014-08-01 03:23:04 GMT
    It's a beautiful afternoon, and you're outside in the park. Then, a powerful thunderstorm moves in within minutes. There are no nearby structures or buildings for shelter, but your car is nearby so you make a run for it. After all, the tires will protect you from lightning strikes, right?Wrong.It's an idea that was first thought of in the late 1800s, on bicycles. A rubber tire is an insulator, so it is very difficult for it to conduct electricity. The same with rubber-soled shoes. The problem...Full Story >
    It's a beautiful afternoon, and you're outside in the park. Then, a powerful thunderstorm moves in within minutes. There are no nearby structures or buildings for shelter, but your car is nearby so you make a run for it. After all, the tires will protect you from lightning strikes, right?Wrong.It's an idea that was first thought of in the late 1800s, on bicycles. A rubber tire is an insulator, so it is very difficult for it to conduct electricity. The same with rubber-soled shoes. The problem...Full Story >
  • Photo of serial killer's inaccurate 'death row' tattoo made public

    Photo of serial killer's inaccurate 'death row' tattoo made public

    Wednesday, July 30 2014 9:12 PM EDT2014-07-31 01:12:13 GMT
    The tattoo has not previously been seen widely by the public because cameras are not allowed inside Indiana courtrooms. The Indiana Office of the Courts released the photo on July 30 as part of evidence logged in by police and presented to the court by the Floyd County Prosecutor's Office.Full Story >
    The tattoo has not previously been seen widely by the public because cameras are not allowed inside Indiana courtrooms. The Indiana Office of the Courts released the photo on July 30 as part of evidence logged in by police and presented to the court by the Floyd County Prosecutor's Office.

    Full Story >
  • Hundreds of teens have died playing this old, but popular game

    Hundreds of teens have died playing this old but popular game

    Thursday, July 31 2014 10:53 AM EDT2014-07-31 14:53:25 GMT
    A troubling and alarming old game has resurfaced on social media. Teens across the country are passing out to get high, and the consequences could be deadly.Full Story >
    A troubling and alarming old game has resurfaced on social media. Teens across the country are passing out to get high, and the consequences could be deadly.Full Story >
TUCSON, AZ (Tucson News Now) -

Wildlife workers are seeing the first signs of what they hope will be a successful breeding season for an endangered bird that was once extinct in the wild.

Earlier this month, workers found eggs in a wild flock of California condors in both Arizona and Utah. Eggs also turned up in a captive flock in Idaho.

Last year, four young condors hatched in the Arizona-Utah wild population, the most ever in one season.

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the California Condor is one of the rarest bird species in the world, with less than 250 living in the wild as of last year.  Poaching, poisoning and destruction of their habitat nearly wiped the bird out in the 1980's until an aggressive effort began to save it.

The first egg in the wild Arizona-Utah flock was reported Feb. 11. The adults will incubate it for about two months in their nest at a remote location in Vermilion Cliffs National Monument. Biologists will continue to monitor the birds from afar to confirm when the eggs hatch and the nestlings take their first flight. They will continue to observe the young birds as they are raised by their parents for about a year.

Breeding is also under way in the captive flock at The Peregrine Fund's World Center for Birds of Prey in Boise, Idaho. The center expects the captive flock to produce up to 20 young birds this season.
  
The recovery effort is a cooperative program by federal, state, and private partners including the Arizona Game and Fish Department and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

For more information on condors in Arizona-Utah, visit www.azgfd.gov/condor

Copyright 2014 Tucson News Now All rights reserved.

 

Powered by WorldNow