Police arrest second man in connection to missing UC professor - Cincinnati News, Weather, Sports from FOX19 NOW-WXIX

Police arrest second man in connection to missing UC professor

Kevin Howard (Photo: Kentucky State Police) Kevin Howard (Photo: Kentucky State Police)
LEXINGTON, KY (FOX19) - The second man who was wanted in connection to the disappearance of a missing University of Cincinnati professor was arrested Wednesday in Lexington, Ky.

Kentucky State Police in Morehead were notified by the Lexington Police Department that Kevin Howard, 37, was located and being held on a warrant obtained by the Kentucky State Police in Morehead.

Howard, of Owingsville was charged with murder, tempering with physical evidence, and theft by unlawful taking of an automobile over $500. 

Howard is being held at the Fayette County Detention Center.  The case is remains under investigation by Detective Wess Prather. 

On Oct. 3, authorities say Charles Black, 55, led police to a body in Fleming County, Ky. and claimed it belonged to Randall Russ, who was last seen on Aug. 18. Officials have not confirmed it is Russ' body and are using DNA analysis to positively identify the remains.

Black, of Hillsboro, was arrested and charged with murder, tampering of evidence and auto theft on Oct. 3.

Related content:

UC computer science professor reported missing from N. Ky

Police find missing UC professor's vehicle

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