Coroner releases name of victim in Fairfield bowling accident - Cincinnati News, Weather, Sports from FOX19 NOW-WXIX

Coroner releases name of victim in Fairfield bowling accident

David Geiger (back center) (Photo: Facebook) David Geiger (back center) (Photo: Facebook)
According to authorities, the victim got caught in the machinery at Northwest Lanes (Photo: FOX19) According to authorities, the victim got caught in the machinery at Northwest Lanes (Photo: FOX19)
BUTLER COUNTY, OH (FOX19) -

The Butler County Coroner's office on Friday released the name of the worker who died Thursday while doing maintenance work in a Fairfield bowling alley.

According to the coroner's office, David Geiger, 53, of Cincinnati died of asphyxiation.

Geiger was doing maintenance in the back on a pin setter when part of his clothing got caught in the machine, Fairfield police said. The equipment pulled him in, killing him. 

Federal officials confirmed Friday they are investigating the case.

Bill Wilkerson, area director for the Cincinnati office of the U.S. Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), said investigators responded to Northwest Lanes on Happy Valley Drive immediately following the incident. They plan to return next week as they continue their probe.

"It's a very tragic accident," he said.

No one heard or saw the accident, authorities say, but another employee at the bowling alley found Geiger about ten minutes after it happened.

"He was sent back with a problem with one of the lanes," said police spokesman Doug Day. "He went back there and they tried to call him and when he didn't answer the call they went back there and found him. It's not something they have happen very offer so like the other employees it's a small business, so they're all affected."

Geiger had worked for the bowling alley about four years.

"David was a great guy, he was known well through the bowling community...hard worker, always willing to help out and anything he cold and it's a very tragic situation," said Jason Vandermark, a general manager at Western Bowl, and who knew Geiger.

OSHA's involvement is important because the federal agency which oversees workplace safety will determine whether job safety rules were violated. The agency can issue citations and fines.

Wilkerson declined to say what investigators have determined so far.

"He got caught in the mechanism at the back of the pin side of the alley and it resulted in his death, unfortunately. I don't want to be premature in my judgments," he said. "The (Butler County) coroner has to weigh in on the exact cause of death."

It's not clear when the investigation will end, but it could be soon.

"I would hope it would wrap up within a couple of weeks," Wilkerson said. "That may or may not happen because of information we need to gather. That may take some time."

OSHA doesn't have prior dealings with this bowling alley, he noted.

"We have had, on occasion, investigations at bowling alleys based on worker complaints or an accident or something, but they are not very frequent," he said."

Copyright 2014 WXIX. All rights reserved.

  • FOX19 HeadlinesMore>>

  • Strong quake near Osaka, Japan, kills 3, knocks over walls

    Strong quake near Osaka, Japan, kills 3, knocks over walls

    Sunday, June 17 2018 9:29 PM EDT2018-06-18 01:29:52 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 7:42 AM EDT2018-06-18 11:42:12 GMT
    (Takaki Yajima/Kyodo News via AP). School children take shelter at schoolyard in Ikeda, Osaka, following an earthquake Monday, June 18, 2018.  A strong earthquake has shaken the city of Osaka in western Japan. There are reports of scattered damage incl...(Takaki Yajima/Kyodo News via AP). School children take shelter at schoolyard in Ikeda, Osaka, following an earthquake Monday, June 18, 2018. A strong earthquake has shaken the city of Osaka in western Japan. There are reports of scattered damage incl...

    A strong earthquake shook the city of Osaka in western Japan, causing scattered damage including broken glass and partial building collapses.

    Full Story >

    A strong earthquake shook the city of Osaka in western Japan, causing scattered damage including broken glass and partial building collapses.

    Full Story >
  • Audi CEO detained in diesel emissions case

    Audi CEO detained in diesel emissions case

    Monday, June 18 2018 5:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 09:20:03 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 7:41 AM EDT2018-06-18 11:41:44 GMT
    (AP Photo/Michael Sohn, file). FILE - In this Thursday, May 3, 2018 file photo, Rupert Stadler, CEO of Audi AG, attends the shareholders' meeting of the Volkswagen stock company in Berlin, Germany. German prosecutors say they have expanded their probe ...(AP Photo/Michael Sohn, file). FILE - In this Thursday, May 3, 2018 file photo, Rupert Stadler, CEO of Audi AG, attends the shareholders' meeting of the Volkswagen stock company in Berlin, Germany. German prosecutors say they have expanded their probe ...
    German authorities have detained the chief executive of Volkswagen's Audi division, Rupert Stadler, as part of a probe into manipulation of emissions controls.Full Story >
    German authorities have detained the chief executive of Volkswagen's Audi division, Rupert Stadler, as part of a probe into manipulation of emissions controls.Full Story >
  • Compulsive video-game playing now new mental health problem

    Compulsive video-game playing now new mental health problem

    Monday, June 18 2018 5:20 AM EDT2018-06-18 09:20:00 GMT
    Monday, June 18 2018 7:41 AM EDT2018-06-18 11:41:35 GMT
    In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)In its latest revision to an international disease classification manual, the U.N. health agency said Monday that classifying "Gaming Disorder" as a separate condition will 'serve a public health purpose for countries.' (Source: Pixabay)

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    Full Story >

    The World Health Organization says that compulsively playing video games now qualifies as a new mental health condition, in a move that some critics warn may risk stigmatizing its young players.

    Full Story >
Powered by Frankly