WATCH: Police museum ribbon-cutting ceremony - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

WATCH: Police museum ribbon-cutting ceremony

Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society Museum (FOX19 NOW/file) Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society Museum (FOX19 NOW/file)
Forest Park Police Chief Phillip Cannon cut the ribbon Thursday to officially open the Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society Museum. (FOX19 NOW) Forest Park Police Chief Phillip Cannon cut the ribbon Thursday to officially open the Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society Museum. (FOX19 NOW)
CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) -

At long last, the doors are open again at Greater Cincinnati Police Historical Society Museum.

Organizers held a 9:30 a.m. ribbon-cutting ceremony Thursday. Forest Park Police Chief Phillip Cannon did the honors, symbolizing the museum's inclusion of law enforcement agencies across the Tri-State.  

The museum is leasing office space on the northeastern edge of Downtown on Reading Road just past Sycamore Street, across from Hamilton County's courthouse and jail.

Museum docents, mostly retired law enforcement officers, are determined to keep history alive and honor the men and women who died in the line of duty in eight counties of Ohio, Kentucky and Indiana.

It hasn't been easy.

The museum embarked on an unsuccessful, $6 million capital campaign in 2010 to build and operate a new facility when they learned the lease at their old facility in Queensgate wasn't being renewed. 

Operators do not charge admission and depend on donations to keep the museum running. They were forced to close their doors at the end of 2013 and store all their exhibits and artifacts.

Earlier this year, they moved in to their new digs with 110 displays, including the country's largest detective police badge collection, more than 700 boxes of nearly 5,000 artifacts and thousands of archives.

Representing 150 years of police history, the museum also features photos of the nearly 200 officers who have been killed in the line of duty across the Tri-State since the 1880s.

For more information and to follow the museum, visit their website: http://www.gcphs.com/

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