Prayer caravan offers hope to neighborhoods rocked by violence - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Prayer caravan offers hope to neighborhoods rocked by violence

The group boarded a bus which they dubbed the "prayer caravan," that trekked across Cincinnati. They sang hymns and stopped for prayer to offer a message of hope to the neighborhoods plagued by violence. (Photo: FOX19 NOW/Gordon Graham) The group boarded a bus which they dubbed the "prayer caravan," that trekked across Cincinnati. They sang hymns and stopped for prayer to offer a message of hope to the neighborhoods plagued by violence. (Photo: FOX19 NOW/Gordon Graham)
CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) - More than a dozen local pastors and people of faith visited several Cincinnati neighborhoods Thursday rocked by recent violence in observance of the National Day of Prayer.  

The group boarded a bus which they dubbed the "prayer caravan," that trekked across Cincinnati. They sang hymns and stopped for prayer to offer a message of hope to the neighborhoods plagued by violence. 

Avondale was the first stop, which this year leads the city in the number of shootings. Pastor Ennis Tate led the group in prayer. 

“Prayer to God for the healing of Avondale for a place God that the enemy has tried to rob of its peace, rob of its future, rob of its history, but today we declare on this the Lord's day that Avondale can and will be healed,” said Ennis in prayer.

Next was Walnut Hills where 17 year-old Kelsie Crow was fatally shot last month.  

Pastor Tate's wife, Sheree, led the group as they prayed for an end to violence. 

“No more oh God. blood slaughtered oh God, no more.  God, violence, no more of our children, stopped before they even get a chance to begin,” said Tate in prayer. 

Then it was back on the bus for more singing as the group made its way to Over-the-Rhine. 

OTR is a neighborhood trying to move beyond the violence of the past, but a makeshift memorial for a recent murder victim offers a grim reminder that more work needs to be done. 

However, Don Shreve who works in the neighborhood says the prayer caravan comes as a welcome sight. 

“I think this is a great neighborhood. I'm glad they're down here. Nothing but positive,” Shreve said. 

Darrell Washington says he applauds the prayer caravan's positive influence. 

“This movement is a very crucial one in this time. A lot of youth is getting shot for unnecessary reasons and I believe that prayer itself will help nurture and unite the community,” Washington said. 

Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil says the prayer caravan is a force for good. 

“God hears prayers and they're hoping that if we get enough prayers that they'll be answered that we can reduce the violence in our society and in our community,” Sheriff Neil said. 

The finals stop on the prayer caravan was the Hamilton County justice center, which Pastor Tate calls the center of violence because so many of the areas violent offenders are housed there.

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