Parents want medical marijuana for 7-year-old daughter - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Parents want medical marijuana for 7-year-old daughter

(PHOTO: FOX19 NOW/ Lisa Hutson) (PHOTO: FOX19 NOW/ Lisa Hutson)
FOX19 -

How far would you go to get your child the treatment they need? Would you break the law? Move across the country?

One Cincinnati family is considering both of those options after a recent doctor's visit out of state.

FOX 19 NOW first told you about 7-year-old Sophia last month when her father took her to Colorado to seek treatment for her uncontrollable epilepsy. Her parents say after talking to doctors there about Sophia's condition, they are more convinced than ever medical marijuana could save their child's life.

"They seem very confident that she would probably be a good candidate for it,” said Scott Nazzarine.

7-year-old Sophia was diagnosed at just 8-months-old with the debilitating disorder. Her parents say they have tried every medicine available and while some have worked for a while, the side effects are torturous for Sophia.

"The side effects of the medicines that she has been on especially to control really bad bouts of seizures are so debilitating that she can't--while it may be helping a little bit she can't lead a normal life. She can't go to school like that. She can't even walk up and down the stairs like that,” said Nicole Nazzarine.

Though doctors in Ohio cannot prescribe it, Scott says it doesn't mean they don't support medical marijuana.

"I can tell you pretty much every single doctor we've talked to off the record is supportive of the idea or at least thinks there should

be options,” said Scott.

While Ohio doctors may not be supporting publicly, thousands of Ohioans are. So far more than 116,000 people have signed the petition to legalize medical marijuana in Ohio in light of Sophia's story last month.

Scott Nazzarine says fears the biggest obstacle they face is changing the public opinion around medical marijuana and the difference between what his daughter needs and other initiatives like Responsible Ohio. He says for them, it isn't about legalization but access to what could be a life-saving medicine for Sophia.

"I think the most common comment is I would pretty much do anything for my child and I think any parent pretty much would do anything

for their child and that is the situation we are in right now,” said Scott.

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