Legacy projects will leave behind millions of dollars in good wo - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Legacy projects will leave behind millions of dollars in good works after All-Star Game

(Source: Ben Katko, FOX19 NOW) (Source: Ben Katko, FOX19 NOW)
CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) -

There is more to All-Star Week than just the Home Run Derby and the game itself.

The All-Star festivities are leaving a special stamp in certain spots all over the region through an effort known as MLB All-Star Community Legacy Projects.
 
The 10 projects were expected to draw an investment of $5 million, on top of hundreds of hours of work.  On Tuesday, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred announced that the investment in the projects had swelled to around $8 million.

"The Legacy Project is the most important part of the All-Star Game.  I think we take our greatest pride in leaving something behind after we provide the fans a great show,” Manfred said.

Major League Baseball teamed up with the Reds to invest millions in projects and charities all over Reds Country.

"It's something we do each year with the All-Star host that supports and gives back to the community,” said Tom Brasuell, the Vice President of Community Affairs for the MLB.

Nine youth baseball fields from Withrow High School, to Howell Field in Dayton, to Meinken Field in Covington all got a facelift.

"Major League Baseball and the Cincinnati Reds are devoted, dedicated to reviving baseball in the inner city, and not just in the inner city, but all over our region,” said Reds CEO Bob Castellini.
           
Off the field, the Pediatric Primary Care Waiting Room at Children’s Hospital was also renovated and upgraded.  Another project will help veterans reintegrate to the community through upgrades to the Tristate Veterans Community Alliance.  An effort between the Reds, P&G and the Cincinnati Zoo drew hundreds of volunteers to spruce up and makeover neighborhood house facilities in the West End.  The Pediatric Primary Care Waiting Room at Children’s Hospital was also renovated and upgraded.
           
"Our event this year is about three times bigger in terms of financial investment and certainly community impact than it has been in the past six years,” said Jeff Metzner, a brand manager with P&G.

The last project unveiled, fittingly, was the biggest one.  A 17,000 square feet activity center at the new Larry and Rhonda Sheakley Boys and Girls Club in Price Hill was dedicated on Tuesday just hours before first pitch at Great American Ball Park.

"This will make a huge difference for the city, and it is part of Price Hill and Cincinnati's comeback,” said Mayor John Cranley.   
At the Boys and Girls Club ribbon cutting, Commissioner Manfred mentioned that since 1997, more than $70 million has gone into the Legacy Projects.  Each year, a Boys and Girls Club is included, as it is the official charity of Major League Baseball.

Copyright 2015 WXIX. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly