How to break your smartphone addiction - Cincinnati News, Weather, Sports from FOX19 NOW-WXIX

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How to break your smartphone addiction

(Flikr/GonzaloBaeza) (Flikr/GonzaloBaeza)
FOX19 -

Smartphones only emerged less than a decade ago, but a good portion of Americans have already developed what’s been dubbed “smartphone amnesia.”

That means 46 percent of smartphone users agreed with the statement “I can’t imagine my life without my smartphone,” in a recent Gallup poll. 81 percent of people said they keep their phones nearby “almost all the time during waking hours.”

Checking our phones has become a modern compulsion. Experts have said it could diminish our ability to concentrate or think deeply.

It’s not a bad idea to curb the smartphone temptation and reduce time staring at a screen. Believe it or not – there’s an app for that.

Moment: The app, for iPhones, runs in the background of your phone and tracks usage. You can set a daily limit and the app will “nudge” you when you’re reaching that limit.

Checky: The app tracks how often you unlock your phone and encourages sharing the stats with friends on social media.

You don’t necessarily need an app to break free from your smartphone. Gizmodo suggests turning off notifications, uninstalling apps or activating airplane mode to help reduced the need to check your phone.

Flipd is an app tool to help you stay focused. If you find yourself easily distracted by games, social media, and other apps, Flipd creates a lock screen that removes distractions, but keeps you connected. You can even remotely lock other people's phones to keep those around you in check. Flipd will even have an auto response that will automatically respond to any text message that you receive. 

No Phone Challenge app helps break the smartphone addiction by slowly but surely forcing you to take some time away from your device, once a day, for 30 days.  The idea is to help you live a balanced life that still includes it, to a lesser extent.

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