Ohio establishes first-ever standards for police use of deadly f - Cincinnati News, Weather, Sports from FOX19 NOW-WXIX

Ohio establishes first-ever standards for police use of deadly force

COLUMBUS, OH (AP) -

An Ohio law enforcement board has established the state's first standards for use of deadly force by police.

The standard adopted Friday permits police to use deadly force only when officers are defending themselves or other people from serious injury or death.

“These new standards will not only give law enforcement agencies a clear guide to follow, but will hold everyone accountable and instill better confidence with the public,” said John Born, Director of the Ohio Department of Public Safety, who co-chairs the Board with former state Senator Nina Turner. “There is no doubt that Ohio will be an even stronger state because of these efforts.” 

The board also adopted a new statewide standard for police recruiting and hiring, setting a goal of a qualified diverse workforce, while providing equal employment opportunity.

Gov. John Kasich created the Ohio Collaborative Community-Police Advisory Board after a series of fatal police shootings, including the November death of 12-year-old Tamir Rice in Cleveland.

According to the Ohio Collaborative, they will be sending a letter to police departments and sheriffs’ offices, conducting regional meetings and teleconferences, disseminating information via the Criminal Justice Bulletin, and other criminal justice communication methods to begin communicating these new standards to the state’s nearly 1,000 law enforcement agencies.

Ohio law enforcement agencies would have to adopt the standards as minimum department policies. Agencies also must have policies for training officers in the standards and disciplining them when violations occur.

(Copyright 2015 The Associated Press and WXIX. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)

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