Tensing wore Confederate flag T-shirt under police uniform when - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Tensing wore Confederate flag T-shirt under police uniform when he killed DuBose

Ray Tensing was wearing this Confederate Flag t-shirt under his UC police uniform when he fatally shot Samuel DuBose. (FOX19 NOW) Ray Tensing was wearing this Confederate Flag t-shirt under his UC police uniform when he fatally shot Samuel DuBose. (FOX19 NOW)
Police use of force expert Scot Haug testifies Friday in the Ray Tensing murder trial. (FOX19 NOW) Police use of force expert Scot Haug testifies Friday in the Ray Tensing murder trial. (FOX19 NOW)
Cincinnati Police Officer Jimmy Nghia Duc Pham holds up a gin bottle that was in Samuel DuBose's vehicle. Police said it was filled with perfume. (FOX19 NOW) Cincinnati Police Officer Jimmy Nghia Duc Pham holds up a gin bottle that was in Samuel DuBose's vehicle. Police said it was filled with perfume. (FOX19 NOW)
FOX19 NOW/Jody Barr FOX19 NOW/Jody Barr
CINCINNATI, OH (FOX19) -

Ray Tensing was wearing a Confederate flag T-shirt underneath his University of Cincinnati police uniform when he fatally shot Samuel DuBose during a July 2015 traffic stop.

A photo of the t-shirt, along with Tensing's other clothing items, were presented during testimony by a Crime Scene Investigator Friday. 

The shirt says "Great Smoky Mountains" with an image of the confederate flag in the middle. 

Earlier Friday, a police expert testified that Tensing's use of force was "unreasonable" in the "unjustified" shooting.

Scot Haug, a witness for the prosecution, said he found nothing to indicate Tensing was being dragged by DuBose's vehicle when the shot was fired. 

Tensing did have probable cause to stop DuBose's Honda Accord on July 19, 2015, Haug said. The vehicle did not have a front license plate.

Tensing also acted appropriately when he approached the car, but his decision to lunge into the car to knock out the key was technically unsound, Haug said.

There were other options he could have used, such as stepping back from the car and asking other offices to pursue DuBose.

Haug said he came these conclusions after extensively reviewing the case,which included visiting the Mt. Auburn shooting scene, watching Tensing's body cam video and meeting with Grant Fredericks, the forensic video expert who testified for the prosecution Thursday.

Prosecutors are digging a little deeper Friday into police training and what may have been going through Tensing's mind at the time of the traffic stop.

Live Blog: Ray Tensing Trial

Haug's testimony was followed by Officer Jimmy Nghia Duc Pham, a criminologist with Cincinnati police who investigates criminal acts and determines what may have led to the crime. 

He is explaining the evidence collected at the scene including a gin bottle filled with perfume, a flashlight and DuBose's hat.

Before proceedings began, Hamilton County Common Pleas Court Judge Megan Shanahan told the jury she is releasing redacted jury questionnaires to the media. Their identities will not be revealed.

Of course, FOX19 NOW would never publicize the identity of the jurors in this case or in any other case unless the jurors themselves want to come forward after the case.

FOX19 NOW media partner The Cincinnati Enquirer has requested completed jury questionnaires, which editors, reporters and counsel believe are public record. The Enquirer also does not want to name jurors. It is seeking racial and demographic information about the entire pool of 200 jurors.

On Thursday, the jury heard and saw Tensing's post-shooting interview with Cincinnati police where he said he was being dragged by Samuel DuBose's car and fired his gun because he feared for his life.

A nationally-known forensics video analyst hired by the prosecution then took the jury frame by frame through Tensing's body cam video and said it shows Tensing was never being dragged.

He also said DuBose's car appeared to slightly move forward 800 milliseconds before the shot. Tensing pointed his gun at DuBose's head before the car moved.

Tensing is accused of fatally shooting and killing Sam DuBose, 43, during an Avondale traffic stop over an alleged missing license tag in July of last year.

Tensing said DuBose tried to pull away and was dragging him, so he shot him in the head.

Police body camera video footage shows Tensing shot DuBose in the head without provocation, Hamilton County Prosecutor Joe Deters said in July of last year. 

Tensing, 26, has pleaded not guilty to charges of murder and voluntary manslaughter. He remains free after posting 10 percent of his $1 million bond.

If convicted of either or both charges, he faces anywhere from three to 15 years to life in prison.

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