Need help getting over your ex? There's an app for that. - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Need help getting over your ex? There's an app for that.

CINCINNATI (FOX19) -

Anyone who's been through a bad breakup has experienced the symptoms: talking about it incessantly to friends, obsessively checking an ex's social media posts, or trying to run into them accidentally on purpose. 

Ellen Huerta created the app, Mend, after going through a breakup herself, according to “The New York Times.” 

Users are introduced to an animated avatar of Huerta, and her reassuring voice offers guidance on how to move forward, with topics like “detoxing” from your ex; redefining your sense of self — even how to get a better night’s sleep. 

The app's voice is also key because, although it's like it's talking to you, it's impartial. 

Let's face it. Although we tend to consult those closest to us when we go through a bad time in life, we sometimes can't handle their harsh truths or be sure they're not just trying to make us happy. What we really need is someone who doesn't know the specifics. 

We also want someone to remind us we're not crazy.

One of my favorite Mend bits is this: "It's normal to crave your ex after a breakup. It means you're human."

The app compares getting over an ex to giving up caffeine or sugar, which might sound funny, but it's true.

We crave them, we go through withdrawal. That's normal. 

Another good piece of advice I got is that holding on to a relationship or the memory of one can be debilitating. It makes us weak. The strong thing is to let go. 

The daily "it's time to mend" notifications are also nice because anyone who has been through a breakup knows how lonely it can seem.

Mend is like your unbiased best friend reminding you to relax and make your life about you right now. 

As I gush over this new virtual relationship therapist (which shouldn't replace a licensed professional, by the way) it's important to realize its place in greater culture. 

There's a lot of talk of how technology has reshaped the way we start relationships, with apps like Tinder or Bumble. Or, how we end them by unfriending on social media. Until now, though, there hasn't been much emphasis on how technology can reshape what comes after the make out and the breakup: The rebuilding stage.

If Mend catches on, this could be the start of a healthier, happier dating scene in the digital age.

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