Ohio sheriff wants feds to reinstate his authority to target, de - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Ohio sheriff wants feds to reinstate his authority to target, detain illegals

Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones stands next to a illegal aliens sign he had placed in the parking lot of the Butler County Sheriff's Department, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2005 in Hamilton, Ohio. (AP Photo/David Kohl) Butler County Sheriff Richard Jones stands next to a illegal aliens sign he had placed in the parking lot of the Butler County Sheriff's Department, Thursday, Nov. 3, 2005 in Hamilton, Ohio. (AP Photo/David Kohl)
HAMILTON, OH (FOX19) -

An Ohio sheriff said he is still waiting for federal authorities to restore his agency's ability to target and detain illegal residents, six months after President Donald Trump signed an executive order for local and state law enforcement to do just that.

Under 287(g) of the Immigration and Nationality Act, police can enter into agreements with Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to enforce federal immigration laws. Until 2013, the program included “task force” agreements permitting participating police to arrest suspected immigration law violators and “jail enforcement” agreements.

State prisons and local jails also could try to identify illegals by interviewing them and checking their biographic details against Department of Homeland databases.

Currently, only jail enforcement agreements exist. The Obama administration halted “task force” agreements at the end of 2012 amid racial profiling accusations and fears they negatively impacted police-community relationships.

Trump pledged during his presidential campaign to bring back and expand 287(g). 

Just days after being sworn into office, he signed an executive order reinstating it.

But Jones, the first Midwest sheriff to raise the issue of illegal immigration, said Tuesday he is still waiting and is hopeful it will be restored soon. His agency originally earned the authority back in 2008.

The outspoken,40-year law enforcement veteran has traveled to the Mexican border in Arizona to witness the impact of illegal immigration at its forefront.

Back in Butler County, he said he saw firsthand how illegal immigrants crowded the courts, jails, schools and social service programs, costing taxpayers and local governments millions of dollars they don't have.

"Butler County has been a long time partner with the Department of Homeland Security and Immigration and Customs Enforcement.  We have successfully utilized the Jail Enforcement Model and have upheld the high standards of the 287(g) delegated immigration enforcement authority," Jones wrote Jan. 25 in a letter to Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

"With the increased interest in interior immigration enforcement at the state and local level, I request reinstatement to the 287(g) Task Force Model for the Butler County Sheriff’s Office."

Trump's January order also threatened to withhold federal funds from so-called “sanctuary cities” — jurisdictions where law enforcement won’t give up undocumented residents to the feds, unless they have committed a serious crime.

Cincinnati has joined the ranks of Boston, San Francisco and New York that declared themselves sanctuaries for undocumented immigrants.

Jones also wrote Trump a letter asking him to take immediate action against sanctuary cities in Ohio and called for Trump to deploy federal authorities to Butler County

"I am aware that there are several locations in the State of Ohio that have claimed the title of Sanctuary City to harbor illegal aliens regardless of their criminal status," reads a copy of his Jan. 25 letter.

"I am asking that you immediately begin the process to discontinue federal funding to those locations in Ohio and throughout the United States as quickly as possible."

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