Confederate Civil War memorials remain standing in Ohio (interac - Cincinnati News, FOX19-WXIX TV

Copy-Confederate Civil War memorials remain standing in Ohio (interactive map)

CLEVELAND, OH (WOIO) -

Critics are calling for the removal of memorials honoring Confederate soldiers in southern states following the violent incident in Charlottesville, but several Confederate statues remain standing in Ohio.

Ohio played a prominent role for the Union army in the Civil War, but signs of the Confederacy still linger. According to the Cincinnati Museum, there are four Civil War memorials in Ohio that honor Confederate soldiers.

  • Confederate Capt. William C. Quantrill's grave is marked with a memorial in Dover in Tuscarawas County. Capt. Quantrill was originally buried in Kentucky, but his remains were moved to Dover in 1887.
  • A monument in Columbus at the Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery marks the site where 2260 Confederate soldiers are buried. The monument was erected in 1902.
  • A Confederate monument was erected on Johnson's Island in Lake Erie, north of Sandusky. The monument was built in 1910 and marks the location of a former Confederate prison site. More than 200 Confederate officers are buried in a cemetery on the island, according to the National Park Service. A statue of a Confederate soldier looks out over the graves.
  • In Warren County, a bronze plaque memorializes Robert E. Lee. The plaque was dedicated in 1928.

On Saturday, white nationalists and counter-protesters clashed in Charlottesville. A woman was killed when an Ohio man plowed a vehicle into a group of protesters and more than a dozen others were injured. The white nationalists were gathering to protest the city's plan to remove a state of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee.

Family, friends mourn 3 dead in Virginia rally violence

Some who oppose plans to remove Confederate statues from U.S. cities say the memorials should not be removed because they symbolize American history and honor those ancestors that fought during the Civil War. Those who favor removal say the symbols are a sign of white supremacy. People from both sides of the debate have gathered for protests and vigils.

Download the Cleveland 19 News app and First Alert Weather app.

Copyright 2017 WOIO. All rights reserved.

Powered by Frankly