Ohio lawmaker proposes bill that would allow person to use deadly force in self-defense

Ohio lawmaker proposes bill that would allow person to use deadly force in self-defense
One Alabama lawmaker would like to see changes made to the state's "stand your ground" law. Source: WBRC video

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - A Republican lawmaker introduced legislation that would alter Ohio’s self-defense laws.

If passed, Senate Bill 237 would remove the requirement for a person who feels threatened to retreat before using deadly force during a self-defense situation.

The “Enact Duty to Retreat Act” would modify the law regarding self-defense and is sponsored by Republican Sen. Terry Johnson, the Ohio 14th District.

“Self-defense is a basic, natural human right,” said Johnson. “If a law-abiding citizen is in mortal peril at the hands of an assailant, they should not have to bear further burden of attempting to run away or ‘retreat,’ before using deadly force to protect themselves.”

The bill, which was introduced on Nov. 12, was referred to the Senate Government Oversight and Reform Committee.

A similar “Stand Your Ground” bill was passed by the Ohio House in December 2018, but then-Gov. John Kasich did not approve the final measure.

While Senate Bill 237 would allow an individual to use deadly force in certain self-defense scenarios, three separate gun control bills are currently pending legislative action in Ohio.

This story will be updated.

Copyright 2019 WOIO. All rights reserved.