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AP-US-TRAIN-DERAILMENT-KENTUCKY

Fiery train derailment in Kentucky spills ethanol into river

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Authorities say a large rock slide caused a fiery train derailment in eastern Kentucky that briefly trapped two crew members and caused a chemical leak into a river. Two crew members of the CSX train were initially trapped in a flaming locomotive along the river’s edge Thursday morning before climbing out and waiting for firefighters to rescue them by boat. Officials say they were taken to the hospital with minor injuries. No other injuries were reported. CSX said in a statement that the train derailed into the Big Sandy River in Pike County around 7 a.m. State officials said the Mountain Water District intake was closed until the water can be tested.

CIVIL RIGHTS TRAIL

Sites in Tennessee, Kentucky, added to Civil Rights Trail

MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Officials say two sites in Kentucky and two in Tennessee have been added to the U.S. Civil Rights Trail. The Muhammad Ali Center in Louisville and the SEEK Museum in Russellville are the two new sites in Kentucky. In Memphis, Tennessee, the Beale Street Historic District and the WDIA radio station were also added to the trail, which was launched in 2018 to promote civil rights tourism. The sites were announced at B.B. King's restaurant on Beale Street on Thursday. The Civil Rights Trail includes about 120 churches, courthouses, schools, museums and other landmarks located between Topeka, Kansas, and Washington, D.C.

INSULIN COSTS

House panel approves bill to cap out-of-pocket insulin costs

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A Kentucky House committee has approved a bill to cap out-of-pocket costs that many Kentuckians with diabetes pay for insulin. The measure cleared the House Health and Family Services Thursday without opposition. It goes to the full House next. The bill would limit out-of-pocket costs to $100 per prescription for a 30-day insulin supply. That cap would apply only to people with commercial health insurance plans. The push to provide relief for Kentuckians struggling to afford insulin is supported by Gov. Andy Beshear. He mentioned the issue in his State of the Commonwealth speech last month.

MEDICAL MARIJUANA

Kentucky bill to legalize medical marijuana advances

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Medical marijuana advocates have won an  initial victory in trying to legalize medical cannabis in Kentucky. A legalization measure cleared the House Judiciary Committee on a 17-1 vote Wednesday. The committee room was filled with advocates who have pressed for years to legalize medical marijuana for people battling chronic pain and debilitating medical conditions. The bill that would also regulate medical marijuana now heads to the full House. Rep. Jason Nemes, a leading sponsor of the bill, predicted it has enough support to pass the House. It would then move to the Senate, where its prospects are more uncertain.

TRANSPORTATION-GOVERNOR

Bill would change process to select transportation chief

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — A Republican-led Senate committee has approved a bill to rein in Democratic Gov. Andy Beshear's power to select the state's transportation secretary. The bill cleared the Senate Transportation Committee on Wednesday. It now goes to the full Senate. The bill would limit the governor's choice of transportation secretary to a list of candidates submitted by a newly created board. The board members would be appointed by the governor from a list of nominations submitted by influential business and government groups. The proposal has drawn immediate pushback from Beshear.

MEDICAID-MANAGED CARE

Senate OKs bill to limit companies running Medicaid program

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The Kentucky Senate has passed a bill to limit to three the number of managed care organizations hired by the state to run its massive Medicaid program. The bill cleared the Senate on a 29-7 vote Wednesday. It heads to the House. The state now has five managed care organizations handling most of the state's $11-billion-per-year Medicaid program. The bill reflects widespread frustrations with those companies. Detractors say they cause higher administrative costs for health care providers. The bill is moving through the legislature at a time the state is seeking bids from outside companies for about $8 billion in Medicaid business.