Ohioan living in Spain worries about the U.S. response to coronavirus outbreaks

“It’s been this like crazy free-for-all, with how things have been implemented,”she said.

Ohioan living in Spain worries about the U.S. response to coronavirus outbreaks

CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - Some Ohio families have loved ones living outside of the United States, and they don’t know when they’ll get to see them again during the coronavirus pandemic.

The U.S. State Department issued its most severe travel warning late last week, telling American expats to “have a travel plan that does not rely on the U.S. government for assistance.”

19 News spoke to a woman from Ohio now living in Spain.

We found families with loved ones overseas are worried about them--but it turns out, many of them are more worried about us here in the U.S.

Julie Boddy is from Columbus, Ohio and now lives in Barcelona, Spain.
Julie Boddy is from Columbus, Ohio and now lives in Barcelona, Spain. (Source: Julie Boddy/Facebook)

Julie Boddy is from Columbus and moved abroad in 2007. First she lived in the United Kingdom, and now she lives in Barcelona with her husband.

She’s been documenting everyday life, posting videos on Facebook.

Spain has been under full lockdown with few exceptions for just over a week.

“You have to stay inside unless you’re going to grocery stores, medical appointments that are emergencies, or to walk a dog or visit a relative that has nobody else to take care of them, or to the pharmacy,” Boddy said.

Monday was the country’s deadliest day so far, with 462 new fatalities in 24 hours, according to the EU Observer.

There are more than 33,000 cases of COVID-19 countrywide.

Julie is high-risk herself.

She hasn't left her house in weeks, under doctor’s orders.

“I have epilepsy, Sjogrens Syndrome, Lupus, asthma, and as a result of all of these diseases I've developed some anxiety disorders,” Boddy said.

She hasn't seen panic buying in Spain, and she’s happy with the measures the government put in place.

“There's just not the panic I see in America and the UK, and it makes me really sad seeing people behave that way,” Boddy said.

Every day at 8 p.m. in Barcelona, people walk out to their balconies to clap.

“People open up their doors and they applaud service workers and people working in the grocery stores and pharmacies every single day for five minutes the entire city erupts in applause,” she said.

Boddy said Spain developed a cell phone app that allows people to input their temperature and symptoms.

It identifies people who may have COVID-19, and then officials notify people living nearby.

Boddy hopes she'll be safe as long as she stays inside.

“My biggest anxieties right now are actually not my health or safety, or any of the health and safety here, not even my job, which I assume is at risk with the economy changing, but it’s my family in the US and the UK,” she said.

Copyright 2020 WOIO. All rights reserved.