Latest Kentucky news, sports, business and entertainment at 9:20 p.m. EDT

VIRUS OUTBREAK-KENTUCKY

Coronavirus cases surpass 1,000 in Kentucky

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — Kentucky has surpassed 1,000 coronavirus cases. Gov. Andy Beshear reported 54 new statewide cases Monday and 14 more virus-related deaths from the pandemic. He says total statewide cases reached 1,008. The state’s first coronavirus case was reported a month ago. Since then, schools have closed and many businesses have been temporarily shuttered to try to slow the virus’s spread. The latest cases were about half the daily totals from last week. Beshear cautioned against concluding that it signals as a trend in the fight to contain the virus.  The latest deaths raise Kentucky’s death toll from the virus to 59.

ELECTION 2020-KENTUCKY CONGRESS

Kentucky rep seeks to shore up support from Trump backers

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The Kentucky congressman who drew President Donald Trump's wrath for trying to stall a coronavirus aid package has released a campaign ad aimed at shoring up support from the president's fans. It comes as his primary challenger attempts to win over those voters. The ad shows a photo of U.S. Rep. Thomas Massie with Trump, both smiling and giving the thumbs-up. The Massie ad is airing across Kentucky’s 4th District. It portrays the congressman and Trump as being on the same team against Democrats. Challenger Todd McMurtry's campaign spokesman says the ad covers up Massie’s “do-nothing record."

VIRUS OUTBREAK-GOVERNORS IN THE SPOTLIGHT

Governors seize spotlight amid states' coronavirus response

COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Watching the governor’s daily press briefing is becoming a new daily ritual for families holed up and isolated by the new coronavirus. Governors including Ohio's Mike DeWine, New York's Andrew Cuomo and Kentucky's Andy Beshear have seen their visibility skyrocket amid the global pandemic. A new survey from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research finds more Americans approve of the way their state government is handling the coronavirus outbreak than approve of the federal government's approach. After years of intense focus on Washington and a creeping nationalization of politics, the coronavirus crisis has become a reminder of the significance of leaders closer to home.

CONFEDERATE FLAG-COURTHOUSE

Confederate flag at Kentucky courthouse draws criticism

BENTON, Ky. (AP) — News outlets report that a Confederate flag recently put up on a flagpole outside a Kentucky courthouse has drawn criticism. Marshall County Commissioner Justin Lamb says members of the local chapter of Sons of Confederate Veterans paid for the flag and raised it in front of the government building in Benton. Lamb says it's flying solo to recognize April as Confederate History Month, but it could eventually be part of a permanent Civil War monument that may also contain a Union flag. Since its installation, officials including a former Marshall County sheriff and a Louisville NAACP leader have joined community members in questioning the installation.

TESTING WAIVER

Education Department seeks public comment on testing waiver

FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The Kentucky Department of Education is asking the public for comment on the request and approval to bypass standardized testing this school year. The state applied for a waiver last month after the federal government announced that students affected by schools closures due to the coronavirus pandemic can bypass the testing. The request was tentatively approved, and formal notification was received March 27. Any state receiving a one-year waiver may also receive a waiver from the requirement to use the data in the statewide accountability system. Kentucky included the exemption in its waiver. Public comments on the waiver must be received by close of business Friday.

VIRUS OUTBREAK-FACE SHIELD PRODUCTION

Indiana workshop aims to make 2,000 virus face shields a day

JEFFERSONVILLE, Ind. (AP) — A southern Indiana community workshop is ramping up production of face shields for medical workers, hoping to produce 2,000 each day amid the coronavirus pandemic. Maker13 and the Jeffersonville workshop’s owner, John Riley, are using its 3D printing equipment to make face shields for local hospitals, with help from community partners. The face shields can extend the lifespan of face masks crucial for protecting medical workers from the virus as they treat COVID-19 patients. The News and Tribune reports that Maker13 had been shuttered in March due to the pandemic, but Riley reactivated its equipment for the face shield effort.