From hair loss to mystery rashes, some are feeling the long-term impacts of COVID-19

From hair loss to mystery rashes, some are feeling the long-term impacts of COVID-19
From hair loss to mystery rashes, some are feeling the long-term impacts of COVID-19 (Source: Katie Benjamin)

JACKSON, Miss. (WLBT) - You’ve heard about the most common COVID-19 symptoms: fever, shortness of breath, loss of taste and smell. But for many, symptoms linger or new ones pop up months after the initial diagnosis.

Michelle Boyd was tested and diagnosed with COVID-19 in March. She did go to the ER with chest pain and shortness of breath but only stayed a few hours. Still, she’s found some symptoms hard to shake.

“From March till about the first of June, my fever would not break,” said Boyd. “Your lungs take a hit. That choking cough that I dealt with very badly early on... it just lingered.”

And the latest symptom she and her mom who had the virus are noticing.... hair loss.

“I can’t wash my hair without seeing bundles of things coming out,” described Boyd. “It makes you wonder, how long will this last? Will there be something else that’s going to come up?”

It’s a similar sentiment from Katie Benjamin in North Mississippi. “For me, the after-effects have definitely been worse,” she said.

She’s lost more than 20 pounds, much of that after a severe kidney infection after having the virus.

“Since March 23, I haven’t been myself. I don’t have the energy that a normal 24-year-old should have,” Benjamin described.

She also developed a rash that doctors couldn’t quite explain.

“I woke up one morning and it was like I was completely covered and my face and it went from blisters to like these sores,” said Benjamin.

Both her mom and grandfather who had the virus had a similar symptom months after initial diagnosis.

Another potential complication is making headlines recently. “As you may have seen, there were five Big Ten football players recently tested positive for myocarditis,” said State Health Officer Dr. Thomas Dobbs. “It’s an inflammatory condition of the heart related to the coronavirus.”

Dobbs says he’s spoken with Mississippi cardiologists and they are looking to learn more about the link between the two.

There was a CDC report released last month that stated about a third of COVID patients who were never sick enough to be hospitalized are not back to their usual health up to three weeks after diagnosis.

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