Ohio Supreme Court kills Kanye’s presidential bid

Ohio Supreme Court kills Kanye’s presidential bid
Kanye West has lost his suit to get on the November 3 ballot in Ohio.

COLUMBUS, Ohio (FOX19) - Kanye West’s bid to get his name on the Ohio presidential ballot this November has come to an end.

The Ohio Supreme Court on Thursday denied his request seeking to compel Sec. of State Frank LaRose to certify him and his running mate for the Nov. 3 general-election ballot.

The court’s full decision is included at the end of this article.

West’s request came after LaRose announced Aug. 21 the entertainment icon and running mate Michelle Tidball had made a technical, but ultimately disqualifying paperwork error.

Under Ohio election law, to appear on the ballot independent candidates for president and vice president must file a jointly signed statement of candidacy as well as a nominating petition with a sufficient number of signatures.

West and Tidball submitted one original statement of candidacy and 1,400 part-petitions, each with a copy of a second, distinct statement of candidacy. The part-petitions weren’t at issue per se, but Ohio election law requires each part-petition to be accompanied by copies of the same statement of candidacy originally filed with the secretary of state’s office.

Ohio revised code 3513.261, quoted in the court decision, reads:

“A nominating petition may consist of one or more separate petition papers (...). If the petition consists of more than one separate petition paper, the statement of candidacy of the candidate or joint candidates named need to be signed by the candidate or joint candidates on only one of such separate petition papers, but the statement of candidacy so signed shall be copied on each other separate petition paper before the signatures of electors are placed on it.” (Emphasis by the court.)

Kanye West and Michelle Tidball's statements of candidacy, one submitted to the secretary of state's office, the other copied and attached to each part-petition in violation of Ohio election law.
Kanye West and Michelle Tidball's statements of candidacy, one submitted to the secretary of state's office, the other copied and attached to each part-petition in violation of Ohio election law. (Source: Ohio Supreme Court)

The discrepancy was spotted when the part-petitions were sent to county boards of elections for verification of signatures.

The original statement of candidacy and what the court termed the “circulated version” contained several differences, most notably Tidball’s signature. Other differences (quoted in full from the court’s decision) include:

  1. "The dates of West’s and Tidball’s signatures on the original statements of candidacy are different from the dates on the circulated version. And Tidball’s signature on the original is dated after the circulated version;
  2. "The information provided in Tidball’s statement of candidacy is handwritten on the original but typewritten in the circulated version;
  3. "The original does not disclose the existence of a nominating committee, whereas the circulated version contains the names and addresses of five individuals purporting to be members of the nominating committee; and
  4. The “Nominating Petition” section of the form in the circulated version has West’s and Tidball’s names printed in the spaces to name the candidates, but the original does not."

The “circulated version” of the statement of candidacy was never submitted to the secretary of state’s office.

Copyright 2020 WXIX. All rights reserved.