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Clifton residents want city’s first LED stop signs at busy intersecton

Residents say pedestrian safety is paramount with lots of young children using the intersection every day.
Published: Jul. 27, 2021 at 10:39 PM EDT
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CINCINNATI (WXIX) - An effort is underway to improve the safety of a Clifton intersection that residents say children often use to get to school.

The intersection at Resor and Middleton avenues sits near three grade schools, making pedestrian safety a huge concern.

“That’s hundreds of kids and their parents crossing all the time,” resident Tim Maxey said. “[...] High rate of speed, no adherence to the crosswalk... I have literally had people swerve into oncoming traffic just to avoid waiting the five seconds for me to finish crossing the crosswalk. They’ve done that even with small children.”

Maxey says some residents went to the city with their concerns. Cincinnati City Council then passed an ordinance to accept donations of up to $2,920 for the project.

Residents have requested blinking stop signs be added to the intersection.

Currently, traffic must stop along Resor, but there are no stop signs along Middleton.

The plan is to turn the intersection into a full four-way stop.

Residents also want striped crosswalks on all four sides.

“With the ordinance, this is the first time that blinking LEDs on stop signs will be used in the city,” Maxey explained, “but they’re used in the neighborhoods around the city, and they’re used elsewhere in the nation, and the statistics are real, and they’re fantastic. So it’s just something that needs to happen.”

There is no available cost estimate for the project. Maxey started a GoFundMe with a $3,120 goal. Residents have donated $2,980 so far.

That money will go toward the blinking LED stop signs.

Money will also come from an existing capital improvement project fund dedicated to pedestrian safety improvement, per the city ordinance.

“It’s so critical for any neighborhood that wants to keep growing to make sure it maintains the safety of the children,” Maxey said. “It takes one child to get hit by a car, and families, they just start leaving, and young families are the lifeblood of any neighborhood.”

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