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Supporters of bill that would ban employers from requiring vaccinations protest at Ohio Statehouse

Supporters of a bill that would prohibit public and private employers from requiring...
Supporters of a bill that would prohibit public and private employers from requiring vaccinations or punishing workers who don't receive them rally in favor of the legislation demonstrate outside the Ohio Statehouse, Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2021, in Columbus, Ohio. The legislation, which had an additional hearing Tuesday with no vote scheduled, has found support among some who do not want to take a coronavirus vaccine, but it also covers all other vaccines. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)(Andrew Welsh-Huggins | AP)
Published: Aug. 24, 2021 at 12:52 PM EDT
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CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) - Testimony continued for the second day in a row on Tuesday for a bill that, if passed, would prohibit employers from requiring workers to get vaccinated.

Supporters of the proposal gathered outside of the Ohio Statehouse in Columbus on Tuesday with signs with messages like “Enact vaccine choice” as the additional House Health Committee hearing was underway.

Supporters of a bill that would prohibit public and private employers from requiring...
Supporters of a bill that would prohibit public and private employers from requiring vaccinations or punishing workers who don't receive them rally in favor of the legislation demonstrate outside the Ohio Statehouse, Tuesday, Aug. 24, 2021, in Columbus, Ohio. The legislation, which had an additional hearing Tuesday with no vote scheduled, has found support among some who do not want to take a coronavirus vaccine, but it also covers all other vaccines. (AP Photo/Andrew Welsh-Huggins)(AP)

If passed, the Republican-backed House Bill 248 would prohibit mandatory vaccinations and status disclosures. It is not specific to the COVID-19 vaccine.

“The purpose of this legislation is to allow people to choose to do what they feel is best for their own body and protect individuals from any consequences or hardships for choosing one way or the other,” State Rep. Jennifer Gross, the bill’s co-sponsor, previously said in a press release.

Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine previously expressed opposition to the bill.

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