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Stink bugs seeking warmth starting to invade homes

Published: Oct. 7, 2021 at 4:37 PM EDT
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CINCINNATI (WXIX) - Stink bugs are beginning to invade homes as they seek a warm place for hibernation.

The Brown Marmorated stink bugs will first gather on the south and west-facing sides of your home.

“When the temperature drops, they’re going to be following heat,” explains Mount St. Joseph University School of Behavioral and Natural Sciences Dean Dr. Gene Kritsky. “They’re going to find nooks, crannies, cracks in bricks, openings in screens. They get up into attics, and that’s when they get into homes.”

If you find one in or around your home, try not to smash them or crush them.

If you do, you’ll soon smell why they are called stink bugs.

“They’re called stink bugs because they have a redundant gland that gives off this defensive odor,” says Dr. Kritsky.

You can vacuum the bugs, but either empty the vacuum or get a new bag right away.

You can also flush them or collect them in water before releasing them outside.

“One of the easiest things I’ve ever tried is to take a water bottle, cut off the top, take the top, reverse it and make it like a little nozzle that goes into the bottle,” Dr. Kritsky continues, “And then you scoop them up into that with a little bit of water and that can hold onto them until you get them outside then dump them outside.”

If you want to prevent them from entering your home in the first place, there are a few things you can do now to keep them out.

“Walk around your house. Inspect the screens. Do you have a screen over your attic? Is there a screen over your fireplace to keep them from going down into the house?” Dr. Kritsky adds. “Make sure you don’t have cracks around your window, caulk up ceiling areas where they might get in. That’s the best defense to keep them out and let them find other places to go.”

The bugs do not bite humans or pets, but they can eat fruit, seeds, corn, and other plants. If you do spot one, it’s best to try to get rid of it so it doesn’t stink up your house or feed off of your vegetation.

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