Advertisement

Lily’s Law, toughening Kentucky’s DUI laws, heads to House floor

Lily’s Law, named after an Oldham County teen who died in a crash while on her way to school, has passed through the House Judiciary Committee.
Published: Mar. 16, 2022 at 6:57 PM EDT
Email This Link
Share on Pinterest
Share on LinkedIn

LOUISVILLE, Ky. (WAVE) - Lily’s Law, named after an Oldham County teen who died in a crash while on her way to school, has passed through the House Judiciary Committee.

Lily Fairfield died on November 10, 2021 when Teresa Devine crashed into her car three days after being arrested and immediately released on a DUI charge.

Devine has not been charged in Lily’s crash pending test results.

During that arrest, Devine admitted to having taken a narcotic used to help with opioid addiction. The officer described how impaired she seemed, disoriented and unable to keep her balance. Devine did not get a bond, was administratively released, and was back home and driving before crashing into Lily.

Lily’s sister, Zoe, was driving the car that morning and suffered serious, but non-fatal injuries. She wants to honor Lily’s life by making Kentucky’s DUI laws tougher.

She testified Wednesday in front of the committee.

“I hope to honor her life by making the roadways safer for everyone,” Zoe told the committee. “Today, this body has an opportunity to do just that. House Bill 185 is the proper step forward to ensure no other families face what mine has.”

The changes would increase the hold time for a DUI suspect from four hours to 12. It would also make the third DUI offense a felony, rather than the fourth.

The amendments were attached to House Bill 185 which is already headed to the Senate.

That bill removes the requirement there be a serious crash, injury or death in order for an officer to obtain the driver’s blood if impairment is suspected.

Lily’s Law is now headed to the House and later to the Senate.

The family’s attorney, Danielle Blandford, told us they are thrilled the changes are moving ahead.

“We are so thankful for Representatives Nemes, Heavrin, Miller and Speaker Osborne for giving Mark, Zoe and Lily Fairfield a voice today in Frankfort,” Blandford said. “In Lily’s honor, we accomplished the first step in making safer roads for all Kentuckians. There are no words to describe the courage that Zoe Fairfield showed in her testimony today in front of the Judiciary Committee and we are hopeful that Lily’s Law will soon be a reality in the coming days.”

WAVE — Louisville and Southern Indiana's NBC affiliate. Follow us on Twitter & Instagram...
WAVE — Louisville and Southern Indiana's NBC affiliate. Follow us on Twitter & Instagram @wave3news.(WAVE)

Copyright 2022 WAVE. All rights reserved.